Tajikistan 2006

Tajikistan 2006

Yearbook 2006

Tajikistan. At the beginning of the year, Tajikistan was hit by a tragedy when thirteen children perished in a fire in a home for mentally challenged children in the capital, Dushanbe. The children were asleep when the old wooden building caught fire.

According to CountryAAH, major public holidays in Tajikistan include Independence Day (September 9) and New Year (January 1). Authorities announced in January that during the previous year, hundreds of members of the banned Hizb ut-Tahir Islamic movement had been arrested. Nearly forty of those arrested had been sentenced to imprisonment for up to twelve years and the others were held in custody pending trial.

Authorities began in March to demolish the area where Tajikistan’s last Jewish synagogue has been around for a long time. The site would be cleared for the construction of a new presidential complex in Dushanbe. The small group of poor and elderly Jews said they did not receive adequate compensation from the authorities. Jews have lived in Tajikistan for many centuries, but after the Soviet era, their numbers have decreased.

In August, the Islamic renewal party’s longtime leader Said Abdullah Nuri passed away, which led to the party not running in the November presidential election. Nor did the other major opposition parties take part in the election, which according to the official result was won by President Imomali Rachmonov with 79% of the vote. According to the OSCE, the election was not fair and no real alternatives were missing. But after fourteen years in power, Rachmonov was able to begin a new seven-year term as president.

General information about Tajikistan

Tajikistan is the smallest of the former Soviet Union and Central Asian states. The high mountain ranges, the Pamir and the Altai, run through the land. Many rivers start from the mountains and the water from these has been used to irrigate cotton fields and produce hydropower. 93% of Tajikistan is mountainous and more than half of the country is located at an altitude of more than three kilometers. Some of the mountain areas are isolated from the rest of the country for much of the year.

The mountains are home to large mammals, including bears, jackals and snow leopards. Tajikistan has several nature parks and other protected areas, Pamir National Park is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The capital, Dushanbe, has many extensive parks and streets lined with tree lines. Public buildings are magnificent, there are also many new buildings.

Tajikistan Map with Surrounding Countries

TAJIKISTAN (AT, 92 and 103-104). – This name usually indicates the federated republic of Tajiks (Avtonommaja Tad ž ikskaja SS Respublika), one of the sects that are part of the USSR and whose constitution dates back to 1925. A border country with Afghānistān to the south and Sin-Kiang to the west, it is limited to the north-east by the Autonomous Republic of the Kyrgyz north-west and west from the Uzbek Federated Republic. Before the revolution and the current political-administrative order, the territory of today’s Tajikistan was included almost entirely in the khānate of Bukhara and a small part in the province of Syrdarja. The southern border between Afghānistān and Russia was established in 1895 by a mixed commission, known as “the borders for the Pamir”, and which worked to settle the differences between Russia and England; the Pangi river was chosen as the border line, the name by which it indicates a part of the upper course of the Amu-darja. Tajikistan is a mountainous country, as it extends over almost the entire Transalai system and part of that of the Alai; wedged in the direction of north-east, within the territory of Uzbekistan, it occupies a part of the Fergana basin. As with other republics and autonomous provinces of the USSR, the territorial unity of Tajikistan responds not to physical characteristics, but to ethnic needs. The relief is composed of two mountain systems: the Transalai and the Pamir. The Kyrgyz people usually distinguish with the name of As with other republics and autonomous provinces of the USSR, the territorial unity of Tajikistan responds not to physical characteristics, but to ethnic needs. The relief is composed of two mountain systems: the Transalai and the Pamir. The Kyrgyz people usually distinguish with the name of As with other republics and autonomous provinces of the USSR, the territorial unity of Tajikistan responds not to physical characteristics, but to ethnic needs. The relief is composed of two mountain systems: the Transalai and the Pamir. The Kyrgyz people usually distinguish with the name of pamir the elevated lands to the south and east of the Aralo-Caspian depression, characterized by the lack of tree vegetation and crops along the slopes of chains, which limit, with their slightly accentuated crests, very wide valleys, with a flat bottom, often sprinkled with vast expanses of pebbles, gravels and sands. The best identifiable ranges are those of Aliciur, Pamir proper, Vachan or Nicholas II, which reach altitudes of 5000 and even 6000 meters, while the various passes rarely drop below 4500 meters; to the west the Pamir degrades rapidly, but nevertheless many valleys are still dominated by imposing chains, which isolate them from each other, thus giving rise to small regional units: Karategin, Damaz, Ruǎan, Šugnan. The Transalai-Pamir system is supported by the Pamir region, which, to the north, the Surchab valley divides from the T’ien shan system. The valley of the Kyzyl-su or “red river”, 10 to 22 kilometers wide, is inserted between the two systems of the Transalai and the T’ien shan; it is characteristic for the fertility of the soil and the abundance of surface waters. The Transalai chain, a formidable barrier that rises between the Alai valley and the Pamir, made up of reddish sandstones, crystalline schists and diorites, offers the highest altitudes in the eastern area, where the Lenin peak (7127 m.). To the west a new chain begins, known as Peter the Great, which in effect is divided into three minor chains, which present a great variety of geomorphological elements; in it there are the peak of Garmo (7500 m.), the highest peak in all of Russian Central Asia, and, among the many glaciers, that of Fedčenko, which is 330 sq km wide. The climate varies according to the altitude and the exposure of the slopes; it is in the highest regions of the Pamir, beaten by winds of extreme violence and where the insolation is very intense, almost blinding for the great clarity of the atmosphere, very arid and subject to very strong changes in temperature within a few hours; in the valleys and hollows, better sheltered from the cold boreal winds and more sunny, the climatic conditions are much better and favor the development of crops. The exceptional altitude determines particular conditions of life; the pastures are populated by herds of wild sheep and goats and used by Kyrgyz shepherds, who wander from place to place raising camels, sheep, horses and yaks; where then the altitude decreases, the forests appear which are generally more luxuriant on the north-west slopes, where the humidity is higher. The upper valley of the Zerafšan and its tributary Fan is particularly arid and cannot be irrigated due to the great irregularity of the relief. The bushes of teresken o it is particularly arid and cannot be irrigated due to the great irregularity of the relief. The bushes of teresken o it is particularly arid and cannot be irrigated due to the great irregularity of the relief. The bushes of teresken o Eurotia ceratoides, who supply firewood and grasses from the pastures, serve as shelter and food for flocks of sheep and wild goats; the other most frequent animals are the bear, the white panther, the wolf and endless birds of passage; not very rare is the tiger.

The main watercourse is the Amu-darja, ancient Oxus, known for the first part as Vachan-daria and then as Pangi, and whose sources are found in the Hindu-kush chain; not a few watercourses flow to it, fed by glaciers and snowfields and which all flow from north-east to south-west. In the easternmost valleys there are several lakes, and among others the Kara-kul, the Šor-kul, the Saraz and the Yašil-kul, the latter formed along the course of the Murgab, following a landslide, caused by the earthquake of 1911, which barred the bed.