Bolivia 2006

Bolivia 2006

Yearbook 2006

Bolivia. On January 4, the electoral authority announced the final results of the December congressional election, which showed that President Evo Morales Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) has obtained its own majority in the House of Representatives. In the Senate, no party has any upper hand, but the parties of the right-wing opposition are expected to find it easier to get majorities together than MAS. High hopes have been tied both to Bolivia’s peasants and workers and to the Latin American left to Evo Morales, the first Indian in Bolivia’s presidential post. The fact that he represents something new in Bolivian politics in several respects was shown, among other things, by having dressed in chompa, the Aymara people’s traditional costume at the installation ceremony on January 23.

According to CountryAAH, major public holidays in Bolivia include Independence Day (August 6) and New Year (January 1). Morale’s first major task, to convene a Constituent Assembly to write a new constitution for the purpose of “founding” the republic, was realized on July 2. In the referendum on regional self-government, which was held at the same time, the jas side received strong support in the four easternmost departments in the “Crescent Region” (the eastern provinces of Santa Cruz, Tarija, Beni and Pando), where Bolivia’s gas deposits are located. The election result as a whole was a disappointment to the government. Admittedly, MAS received the majority of the votes in the Constituent Assembly election, but it was not as overwhelming as expected and less than Morale’s majority in the presidential election.

The constitutional work also got off to a bad start when the opposition in September boycotted the Assembly in protest at the fact that MAS succeeded in enforcing a decision that constitutional amendments can be taken with a simple instead of a qualified majority, which gives MAS great influence, and that the Constitutional Assembly gains sovereign status over all other state functions. The opposition called it a constitutional coup and threatened with protests and lockouts. MAS had anticipated the May 1 decision to raise the tax on oil and natural gas extraction for foreign companies from 50% to 82%, and the spectacular military takeover of the privately owned gas field San Alberto would provide greater support. The government also proclaimed that major land reform is planned.

In October, the government was shaken by a clash between miners at Bolivia’s richest tin mine in Huanani, with 16 dead and 61 injured as a result. The triggering factor was a government proposal to divide the mine between the state COMIBOL and the cooperative Fencomin.

Foreign policy was characterized by clear markings on the part of Morale, but also a willingness to compromise. He began the year with a comprehensive international tour, including Madrid, Paris and Brussels, where his main business was to reassure investors who saw him as a threat to EU investment in Bolivia, and to South Africa and China. He also visited Cuba and Venezuela, where Presidents Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez welcomed Morale’s victory in Bolivia as another addition to the Latin American left wave. The support from both countries was expressed in the pledges of millions of dollars in aid for social projects and a favorable oil import agreement. The reactions to the decision on tax on foreign oil and natural gas exploitation were low-key from both the US and Spain and Brazil, who have both invested heavily in Bolivia’s natural gas sector. With Chile, a cautious dialogue was opened that Bolivia would reclaim lands lost to the country in 1883. However, a diplomatic conflict with the United States broke out as a result of the revelation that in October 2005, air defense missiles had been brought to the United States to be destroyed by fear that they would be destroyed. would come into the hands of a socialist government through Morale’s victory in the presidential election. Another notable incident in relations with the United States was the bomb attacks on hotels in La Paz on March 21 with two fatalities and eleven injuries done by a mentally ill American who claimed to be admirers of Usama bin Laden. However, a diplomatic conflict with the United States erupted as a result of the revelation that in October 2005, anti-aircraft missiles had been brought to the United States for fear of being destroyed by fear of coming into the hands of a socialist government through Morale’s victory in the presidential election. Another notable incident in relations with the United States was the bomb attacks on hotels in La Paz on March 21 with two fatalities and eleven injuries done by a mentally ill American who claimed to be admirers of Usama bin Laden. However, a diplomatic conflict with the United States erupted as a result of the revelation that in October 2005, anti-aircraft missiles had been brought to the United States for fear of being destroyed by fear of coming into the hands of a socialist government through Morale’s victory in the presidential election. Another notable incident in relations with the United States was the bomb attacks on hotels in La Paz on March 21 with two fatalities and eleven injuries done by a mentally ill American who claimed to be admirers of Usama bin Laden.

Bolivia Map with Surrounding Countries

Bolivia Overview

Bolivia is known for its strong indigenous culture of the Andean region, its stunning and easily accessible mountains and the unique landscapes of the Altiplano plateau.

In Bolivia, you’ll find unspoiled continuous salt deserts, the world’s tallest cities, and flamingo flocks gathering on the salt lakes of the highlands against the backdrop of snow-capped volcanoes.

The colorful culture of the Andean region has been preserved in the Bolivian region more strongly than the neighboring countries and the country also offers wonderful experiences with less visiting the Amazon region.

Bolivia’s tourism services have developed in recent years and, with the country previously inviting mainly more adventurous tourists, Bolivia is already an established part of Andean tours and a favorite destination for mountaineers and climbers.

Bolivia has to take into account the country’s unique location on a mountain plateau. La Paz Airport, at an altitude of 3,600 meters, is located at an altitude of about 4,000 meters, and unobstructed views of the more than 6,000-meter peaks of the Cordillera Real await visitors. These heights should be taken into account in the itinerary and set aside for a couple of days to get used to before starting the trip.

Bolivia is an interesting tourist destination and a wonderful country in the heart of South America. Belonging to the old Inca state, it has a very similar history to Peru. It was liberated from Spanish rule in 1825 and was named after its liberator, Simón Bolívar. There has been more unrest in Bolivia than in other Latin American countries. The movement in recent years has been largely due to disagreements between the country’s largest profession, farmers and the government.

The far-left guerrilla movement was paralyzed by the death of Ernesto “Che” Guevara in the country in 1967. During the Salpietar War, Bolivia lost its only coastal area to Chile. This is still rubbing off relations between the countries. The core area of ​​the country is the plateau, located between the western and eastern main reaches of the Andes as high as 3600-4000 meters above sea level. It is one of the highest inhabited areas on earth.

Area: 1,098,580 km²

Population: 11,639,909 (estimate 7/2020)

Capital: La Paz

Population: 30% Quechua Indians, 25% Mestizos, 30% Aymara Indians, 15% Europeans (Spanish)

Language: Spanish, Quechua, Aymara and their mixed dialects

Religion: Roman Catholicism

Form of government: Republic